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  • The 2018/19 winter wheat is likely to be one of South Africa’s large harvests, thanks to favourable weather conditions and an expansion in area planted. The rainfall and cold temperatures experienced in the past two weeks in the Western Cape province could boost the yields in most regions. The feedback from farmers in most parts of the province has been quite positive in terms of yield expectations. 

  • Nothing can stand in the way of good news, especially if the good news is “food”. I am currently in Somerset West, Western Cape attending an annual conference of the Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa and had planned to write a brief piece about a few aspects I picked up from the research papers presented here today.

  • The wheat import tariff rate of R298.46 per tonne that triggered on 14 August 2018 was finally published in a government gazette on 28 September 2018, making it an official rate. This is a decline from a previous rate of R640.54 per tonne.

  • Our recent interaction with winter wheat farmers in various parts of the country has been quite encouraging. In the major producing province, Western Cape, the crop has matured and generally in good shape with expectations of good yields in most regions – all thanks to rainfall received in the past couple of weeks.

  • South Africa is a net importer of wheat, which means that developments in the global environment tend to influence the local market. Yesterday’s trade session was no different, the SAFEX wheat spot price recorded good gains in line with the Chicago wheat prices, closing at R4 393 per tonne.

  • October 16th is World Food Day and maybe the most fitting thing to do would be to boast about South Africa’s progress in terms of food security, having been ranked by the Economist Intelligence Unit’s 2017 Global Food Security Index the top in Africa.

  • October 16 is World Food Day and perhaps the most fitting thing to do would be to boast about South Africa’s progress in terms of food security, having been ranked by the Economist Intelligence Unit’s 2017 Global Food Security Index the top in Africa. 

  • The U.S. Department of Agriculture on Oct. 12 forecast Australian wheat production and exports in 2018-19 to be the lowest since 2007-08.

  • Climate change is coming like a freight train, or a rising tide. And our food, so dependent on rain and suitable temperatures, sits right in its path.

    The plants that nourish us won't disappear entirely. But they may have to move to higher and cooler latitudes, or farther up a mountainside. Some places may find it harder to grow anything at all, because there's not enough water. 

  • The winter wheat harvest process is slowly gaining momentum in the Western Cape. The most recent data from SAGIS shows that 78 731 tonnes of wheat were delivered to commercial silos in the week of 26 October 2018, well above the initial deliveries of 7 716 tonnes.

  • Grain producers in the Swartland, Overberg and Southern Cape suffered considerable damage due to unnatural weather conditions that brought stormy winds to the areas. While already harvesting winter crops, producers’ expectations for an above average harvest yielded disappointment.

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