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HOLLARD

Fat baobabs, some more than half a millennium old, have endured across Senegal, passed over for lumber largely because their wood is too brittle and spongy for use in furniture. Baobab leaves are mixed with couscous and eaten, the trees’ bark stripped to make rope, their fruit and seeds used for drinks and oils.


Predicting how much grain a farmer will have at the end of the season informs loans, the logistics for companies to transport grain out of the farms, crop insurance, and a farmer’s basic economic well-being. The current “gold standard,” according to the University of Illinois’s press release, is the USDA’s World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates, or WASDE. 


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MONSANTO