• Although the past few months have been a struggle to secure grain supplies for Southern and East Africa, other parts of the world are in better shape and could help offset the shortfall.

  • South Africa- Agri trends.

  • In its new series of 10-year outlooks for corn, soybeans and wheat, the RaboResearch Food & Agribusiness group at Rabo AgriFinance foresees U.S. grain prices remaining stagnant as long-term trends for yield increases make up the difference in lower acreage while demand remains flat.

  • Given ongoing trade discussions with multiple countries, it can be hard to keep up with what’s going on between the United States and our major trading partners. Here’s a rundown of some recent events in the agricultural trade arena.

  • Maize: The tight old crop ending stocks for both white and yellow maize supported prices.

  • The world’s grain bins overfloweth — even after a third straight drought-ravaged wheat crop in Australia and a historically wet and delayed planting season in the U.S. Corn Belt that reduced corn and soybean output in 2019. Barring an unforeseen jolt in supply and/or demand, it’s going to stay that way for a while.

  • Veronica Braker has spent nearly her entire 27-year career in industries and roles traditionally dominated by men — manufacturing, engineering, plant management and agriculture — all while raising five children.

  • The revenue of the grain market in Africa amounted to $109B in 2018, picking up by 9% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers' margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). 

  • Russia, Ukraine and Kazakhstan are turning to policy described as “food nationalism” — protecting their domestic grain markets amid the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, including major grain export restrictions, a highly concerning development for countries dependent on their grain supplies.

  • China, the first country impacted by the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, has seen its grain industry return to normal after about two months of fear and anxiety.

  • The global grains environment has changed somewhat from the optimistic picture of a few weeks ago.

  • To improve profitability in an increasingly competitive and volatile environment, farmers need to have a deep understanding of their profit drivers and tactical management plans in place.

  • In this blog post, I will briefly reflect on South Africa’s recent weekly grain data releases and also on the upcoming 2020/21 production season, leaning on the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) data that was published on Friday evening.

  • The global grain and oilseeds sector is feeling the impact of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic as it has caused ongoing trends such as deglobalization of supply chains and declining biofuels demand to accelerate while increasing concerns about food security, according to a recent study by food and agriculture investor Rabobank.

  • One of the world's oldest grains has found new life. Now, a new $10 million grant aims to further boost commercial use of Kernza.

  • The good news keeps pouring in for SA’s agricultural sector, at least from a production perspective.

  • Oilseed prices have been pushed higher by reduced production expectations, particularly worries over the size of the soybean crop in the United States, and strong demand, with large imports by China. Better-than-expected usage in the US biodiesel industry and tighter supplies in Brazil have added to the bullish tone.

  • "The producers of agricultural products are not responsible for improving the profitability of the value chain outside the farm gate because most agricultural products are traded in a futures or an open market and the result of the free operation of the local and international market forces of supply and demand.

  •  The high-frequency data about South Africa’s 2020/21 summer and winter crop season continue to paint a positive outlook. First, the summer crop growing areas are at early stages of planting.

  • Australian grains production is set to bounce back in 2020-21 after suffering from reduced output for several years due to drought.